The offseason survival guide for New Orleans Saints fans

brianpavek
Nov 30, 2014; Pittsburgh, PA, USA; A New Orleans Saints fan celebrates a touchdown against the Pittsburgh Steelers during the second half at Heinz Field. The Saints won the game, 35-32. Mandatory Credit: Jason Bridge-USA TODAY Sports
Nov 30, 2014; Pittsburgh, PA, USA; A New Orleans Saints fan celebrates a touchdown against the Pittsburgh Steelers during the second half at Heinz Field. The Saints won the game, 35-32. Mandatory Credit: Jason Bridge-USA TODAY Sports /
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Jun 2, 2016; New Orleans, LA, USA; New Orleans Saints wide receiver Michael Thomas (13) during organized team activities at the New Orleans Saints Indoor Training Facility. Mandatory Credit: Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sports
Jun 2, 2016; New Orleans, LA, USA; New Orleans Saints wide receiver Michael Thomas (13) during organized team activities at the New Orleans Saints Indoor Training Facility. Mandatory Credit: Derick E. Hingle-USA TODAY Sports /

Tip #1: Value consistency over sizzle

If you thought the hype was up during OTAs, then you have seen NOTHING yet. Is Michael Thomas a stud? He had better be since the New Orleans Saints spent a second round pick on him, but what fans can’t do (and we as writers can’t do either) is attribute him making great strides and looking great in OTAs to being able to come out and dominate the league right away.

You have to keep things in context. Let us all remember that Marques Colston was an absolute disaster during OTAs, then came back in great shape, made the team in training camp and preseason, and went on to become the greatest wide receiver in the history of the franchise.

That isn’t to say that Thomas can’t be a great player for the team, and I fully expect him to. However, as of today we know nothing. A perfect example is what I mentioned earlier about my own jumping the gun with Brandon Coleman. I focused on the upside, the flashes, the highlights, and didn’t stop to ask how his route progression is, why I’m only hearing about one or two plays per practice, and most importantly why I didn’t wait until the preseason.

There is no reason not to believe that a player who looks great early can make the team and have an impact. Willie Snead and Delvin Breaux did just that last year. However, they were consistently good (to great in Breaux’s case) from the beginning to the end with little variance. The clue was in the consistency of their effectiveness, not in the greatness of any one flash. Let us all learn the lesson of not trusting the sudden flashes of a Nick Toon, or to date a Brandon Coleman (who is NOT a lock to make the roster as much as I still love his potential).

Next: Tip No. 2

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