NFL1000 3-4 Outside Linebacker Rankings: No Love For Junior Galette

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Credit: Crystal LoGiudice-USA TODAY Sports

Junior Galette, #28

Pass Rush: 24/30

Showing a knack for getting after the quarterback, Junior Galette (6’2”, 258 lbs, four seasons) picked up 40 quarterback hurries in fewer than 1,000 snaps in 2013. He possesses excellent burst and footwork when setting up a tackle to get upfield. He’ll accelerate through his crossover step like most great pass-rushers and displays an excellent ability to use his hands to free his body to quickly get around the edge to the quarterback.

Coverage: 6/10

Galette moves well when coming downhill, but that’s not reciprocated when moving backward and attempting to take up space in coverage. He can break to the flat, but when asked to flow in zone coverage, he is kind of a fish out of water.

Run Defense: 11/20

Galette doesn’t possess the natural strength to win one-on-one physical engagements with offensive linemen. If his momentum is stopped and he’s locked up with an offensive lineman in the run game, he’s not going to shed and make that play.

Tackle: 28/40

Possessing elite closing speed and burst, Galette has the ability to zero in on a target and bring him down if there’s a clear path to the ball-carrier. If not, he will struggle to fight through blocks and “sort through the trash” to make a play.

Overall: 69/100

Simply put, Galette finds ways with his quickness and speed to put pressure on the quarterback. Therefore, he is in a pretty good situation.

You’re telling me there are twenty-freakin’-seven better linebackers than Junior? No way, bro. He had the 6th-most sacks in the league (12.0) and played consistently all season long, guaranteeing an unbelievable and much-needed level of swag.

Parys Haralson, #19

Pass Rush: 21/30

In just 373 snaps in 2013 for the Saints, Parys Haralson (6’0”, 255 lbs, seven seasons) missed only two tackles. He doesn’t possess a lot of natural fluidity in his pass-rushing movements, is a little stiff when rushing to the outside and doesn’t have the natural bend around the edge you see from most guys. He displays the upper-body strength to bull rush through tackles and does a nice job of getting his hands underneath the pads of offensive linemen.

Coverage: 7/10

Haralson displays the ability to sink in coverage and recognize underneath routes. He doesn’t have the lateral agility to open and run down the field with tight ends, and he backs out of the backfield. However, he is effective at breaking on crossing routes and hopping to the flat in zone coverage.

Run Defense: 13/20

Haralson is limited by his good but not great athleticism. He struggles with quicker backs and will sometimes lose his ability to accurately target a running back before lunging at him and losing all leverage.

Tackle: 34/40

Haralson displayed the ability to shed blocks and make plays in the running game. He has a solid frame with plenty of upper-body strength to help him drive ball-carriers the other direction upon initial contact. When he connects, his target feels his presence.

Overall: 75/100

Haralson is a guy with limited upside. He doesn’t have the natural athleticism to become a difference-maker on defense, but he provides enough to warrant snaps.

Great addition at a cheap price, Haralson is a solid player who will be at the service of Rob Ryan for another year.

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